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Oxfam’s LFW Show: Fighting Poverty & Fashion Waste

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’re probably aware that we have a fashion waste problem on our hands that’s polluting the earth. Figures suggest that Britons purchase around 1.1 million tons of new clothing annually — about 26.7kg per person. And in 2018, the UK apparently sent 235 million items of clothing to landfill. As such, British MPs called for a tax on throwaway clothes to help deal with the number of garments going to waste sites. 

So for this London Fashion Week, charitable organisation Oxfam had an idea about how we can embrace our love of clothing without creating such a negative impact on the environment. They held a fashion show.

Held at Ambika P3, the cavernous subterranean venue in Marylebone, all clothes presented were styled by Bay Garnett and sourced from Oxfam stores as way to promote buying pre-loved clothing. Shopping at Oxfam holds a double-benefit: while reducing textile waste and contributing to a circular economy, proceeds help to fight poverty.

Pixie Geldof and Stella Tennant

Pixie Geldof and Stella Tennant

Fee Gilfeather, Oxfam’s sustainable fashion expert, has said: “Here at Oxfam we never lose sight of the reason we sell fashion, which is to raise money to help the world’s poorest people. The clothes in Oxfam shops really do transform lives. A £10 dress can provide clean water for 10 people in an emergency.”

Malaika Firth and Neelam Gill

Malaika Firth and Neelam Gill

Wearing looks styled by Garnett that often revolved around different decades, some of the models and personalities who walked the show were Stella Tennant, Laura Bailey, Daisy Lowe and Lottie Moss, as well as music stars Una Healy and Emeli Sande.

Daisy Lowe

Daisy Lowe

Garnett was one of the first fashion editors to pair high-fashion pieces with accessible charity-shop finds in shoots for Vogue. Credited with championing "thrifting", she and fellow magpie stylist, Kira Jolliffe founded the anti-fashion magazines Cheap Date and Fanpages and co-authored the book The Cheap Date Guide To Style. Garnett has said of the show: “I’m styling this for a very simple reason. I love clothes, and the opportunity to work with them in a way that can actually help people is so exciting. I get a lot of pleasure from knowing that. I love second-hand clothes, and I love Oxfam’s commitment to fighting poverty. This collaboration is a no-brainer for me.”

Make-up artist Rebecca Wordingham’s attention to detail, eye for colour and use of textures and prosthetics within her work has earned her an esteemed reputation within the fashion industry. Her work has been featured in editorial titles such as Document Journal, i-D, The Gentlewoman, Dazed & Confused. Alongside her editorial work, Rebecca is also beauty editor for Moodboard Magazine, Creative Director of London School of Media Make-Up.

Laura Bailey

Laura Bailey

Since the show held such diverse fashion looks, and was rooted in positive impact, the beauty mood was natural, healthy looking and wholesome. For all models, Rebecca made sure that the skin was made dewy and luminous with a natural glow using Code8 Radiate Beauty Balm for a perfect skin finish. Code8 Seamless Cover Perfecting Concealer was used to hide any blemishes, and skin was highlighted with the Highlight HD Palette Between Two Women. AM/PM Balm in Spin City was applied to all models to finish for a natural lip look.

 

Oxfam works across many areas of fashion, collaborating with big brands to recycle and reuse stock, joining forces with fashion houses to improve conditions in their supply chains and fighting to improve garment workers’ rights. All profits from the organisation’s fashion sales fund Oxfam’s work fighting poverty and suffering around the world.